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Deep Play

Definition from the cover of:
n. 1. A state of unselfconscious engagement with our surroundings 2. An exalted zone of transcendence over time 3. A state of optimal creative capacity

Diane Ackerman is one of my favorite authors — if you’ve never read her book A Natural History of the Senses, then I suggest you skedaddle to the nearest library and check it out. It is exquisite, particularly when she writes about our sense of smell and our sense of touch, how/why certain customs and words evolved and so on.

The Zookeeper’s Wife is another good one. The latest I’m reading is Deep Play, and so much of it resonates with me on so many levels. My sense of place, my self-definition and the themes I encounter in my daily life — it’s like all of us on this planet really are pulsating to the same rhythm, at different times and sometimes the same time. One breath, one voice, one consciousness. Blows me away. I believe it’s a vibration we’re unconsciously aware of on a subliminal level when we engage in deep play,alone and in community. And the deeper we go in our play, the more in tune with others we seem to become.

More intuitive and sensitive to the subtle nuances and layers of meaning in our everyday language, geography, and encounters, more in touch with our essential spirits — that spirit that transcends time, space and our bodies. It can be scary and exhilarating simultaneously.

A state of heightened attention because we are so in the zone. Riding that Big Kahuna.

Frida’s Fiestas

I’ve been checking out some new blogs this week and am trusting that I stumble back to them if it is meant to be as there was a blogger this past week who mentioned Frida’s Fiestas and I am thankful she did.

I promptly ordered the book from my library and picked it up yesterday. I have spells where I am all about certain countries — India is one, and now Mexico is another. I am biased I suppose, one of my nieces is half Mexican and I enjoyed what I could of Mexican culture when I lived in Southern California in the early 70’s. Still, this book is a treat, reading about a colorful woman artist like Frida in the context of favorite fiesta foods and celebrations even more so.

I want to learn more now, and the thing I love about Mexico is that it’s a lot closer to me than India. Plus I can use my broken high school Spanish if I visit there. A Mondo Beyondo dream would be to live there for say six months and follow the trail of Frida Kahlo for a while. I’m so enamored of her and this book has me dreaming further of how to integrate her into the art, nature and the goddess theme.